education.govt.nz

Video competition honours tīpuna

Issue: Volume 100, Number 4

Posted: 8 April 2021
Reference #: 1HAJbx

Education Gazette chats to the 2020 winners of the Ngārimu VC and 28th (Māori) Battalion Memorial Scholarship Fund video competition, Anahera Te Moana from Te Kura Mana Māori o Whangaparāoa in the te reo Māori category and Jess Jenkins from Tawa College in the bilingual category. 

What were your motivations for applying for theNgārimuvideo competition?

Anahera’s first cousin Tamati visited the graves of tīpuna in the Florence War Cemetery in Italy.

Anahera’s first cousin Tamati visited the graves of tīpuna in the Florence War Cemetery in Italy.

Anahera: I entered the Ngārimu video competition as part of a school project. We were learning about the 28th (Māori) Battalion at the time. My kura prioritises learning from our tipuna, hapū and iwi. Our own stories, for our own. This enables me to be fully connected and strive for success. 

My koro, Te Ua Keepa, lies in foreign soils in the Florence War Cemetery in Italy. I’m proud that my kura, Te Kura Mana Māori o Whangaparāoa travelled to Italy to pay their respects to him and the others from the 28th (Māori) Battalion. The purpose of these maumahara trips is to follow in the footsteps of the Battalion. Seeing the rows upon rows of gravestones made me realise the true price of citizenship. Looking down at Māori names and seeing their ages saddens me. I see it as my duty to honour them. Ka maumahara tonu tātou ki a rātou | We will remember them. 

Jess: I was motivated to enter the Ngārimu video competition not for the contest itself but for its purpose. I believe it is important that rangatahi have the opportunity to reflect, remember and empower our tīpuna that served in the 28th (Māori) Battalion. The competition provides a fantastic vessel of communication for students all around the motu to bring forth the stories of their tīpuna.

Fortunately, my hapū whānau provided great support in assisting with the content of my video. I was able to work with Lillian Wells, daughter of Te Raetea Kahu Paku, who is embedded within the mana of my whakapapa; he served as a soldier in the 28th (Māori) Battalion and was taken prisoner of war. I knew that Lillian's incredible personal research deserved to be digitalised when she sent it to me – it was extensive, enlightening and a great tribute to her father's experiences.

How did you feel when you heard the news that your video entry had won?

Anahera Te Moana

Anahera Te Moana

Anahera: I was proud that my hard work, and that my whānau, hapū and iwi were recognised. I see this as a win for us all. The project was fun for me because I was studying my own tīpuna, Koro Te Ua Keepa. I was able to make meaningful connections. The fact that I was able to enter this in my first language of reo Māori was beneficial to me. Last year my kura won both sections. I knew that I wanted to make my kura proud again.  

Jess: I admit that I didn’t fully appreciate the prestige that is associated with the Ngārimu video competition. I tend to pursue things in life simply because I aspire to the resulting impact that my mahi may possess. When I found out that I had placed first, it was a lovely surprise – I thoroughly enjoyed crafting my video and was proud of the end result. Above all, this video was created in remembrance of Te Raetea Kahu Paku, and it stands as a tribute to him. Winning is a bonus to the taonga of remembrance. 

What advice would you offer those thinking of entering the Ngārimu video competition this year?

Te Ua Keepa, who was a member of the 28th (Māori) Battalion.

Te Ua Keepa, who was a member of the 28th (Māori) Battalion.

Anahera: I am proud to be Māori. I am proud of my tipuna who served in the 28th (Māori) Battalion. I believe it is important for rangatahi to learn about their tīpuna who fought for our freedom. They need to connect to their marae and ask about the photos hanging on the walls. To attend Anzac Days and keep their stories alive. Digitising their stories is one way that can help rangatahi connect so they are aware of the sacrifices our tīpuna made.  

Jess:This competition is for you to honour your tipuna and share their story. Not only is it an opportunity, but it is a great way to explore the connections that you possess to this momentous group of individuals. You want to educate and inspire so utilise your creativity to reach a wide range of people. Remember the sheer sacrifice that many of our tipuna in the 28th (Māori) Battalion gave for the freedoms we enjoy today.

On another note: I had no prior experience in creating a video like this; I produced it using my cell phone on a self-timer, and music stand as a tripod – you don’t require a professional production level! I then put my footage through a video editing application and was able to add relevant supporting materials such as photos and documents. Also, think about the audio aspect of the video and ensure that you sync the footage with this. I didn’t, and I spent hours stitching everything together!

About the Ngārimu video competition

Jess Jenkins says the Ngārimu video competition provides rangatahi with an opportunity to remember tīpuna who served in the 28th (Māori) Battalion.

Jess Jenkins says the Ngārimu video competition provides rangatahi with an opportunity to remember tīpuna who served in the 28th (Māori) Battalion.

 

The Ngārimu VC and 28th (Māori) Battalion Memorial Scholarship Fund video competition honours the legacy of famed Māori soldier Te Moana-nui-a-kiwa Ngārimu VC and other members of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who gave their lives in service during World War II. The competition was organised to honour this legacy and encourages the learning of te reo Māori and Māori history, tradition, and culture as it pertained to the 28th (Māori) Battalion.

 

 

 

Winners of 2020 competition

Te reo Māori category

1st place: Anahera Te Moana from Te Kura Mana Māori o Whangaparāoa for Koro Te Ua Keepa.

2nd place: Kingston Taiapa from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Kawakawa mai Tawhiti for Taku Tipuna Toa: Private Eru Te Pauhu

3rd place: Te Aorangi Morini and Jahniva Hohua from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae for Hokowhitu ā tū ki Tūhoe

Bilingual category

  • 1st place: Jess Jenkins from Tawa College for A Small Hawk in the Rising Sun
  • 2nd place: Rae-Ani Hunter from Te Kura Mana Māori o Whangaparāoa for El Alamein, Egypt
  • 3rd place: Pippa Stone from Putāruru College for
    A Celebration of All Things Before Us.

Winning entries

 

Enter this year’s competition 

The 2021 Ngārimu video competition opens soon and is open to ākonga in Years 7 to 13 with two entry categories: te reo Māori and bilingual. 

For more information, go to Ngārimu video competition – Education in New Zealand(external link). 

BY Education Gazette editors
Education Gazette | Tukutuku Kōrero, reporter@edgazette.govt.nz

Posted: 9:00 am, 8 April 2021

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