education.govt.nz

Young Māori orators inspire audience

Issue: Volume 98, Number 18

Posted: 28 October 2019
Reference #: 1HA1BJ

Ko te kai a te rangatira he kōrero – The food of chiefs is the spoken word
Hundreds gathered for the 2019 national Ngā Pū Kōrero o Āpōpō event – an annual te reo Māori speech competition celebrating te reo Māori through the voices and stories of young Māori orators.

The judging panel.

The judging panel.

As well as being a speech competition, Ngā Pū Kōrero o Āpōpō is a platform for Māori rangatahi to tell their stories, share their views about important kaupapa and enhance their sense of pride, wellbeing and confidence through owning the stage.

On 2 October, 37 junior, intermediate and senior students from across Aotearoa lined up at the World War II Soldiers Memorial Stadium in Masterton to compete for taonga (trophies) and the honour of winning their respective age sections.

Taonga were presented to the winning speakers in six categories:

  • E Tipu e Rea – Junior Girl (10–12 years)
  • E Tipu e Rea – Junior Boy (10–12 years)
  • Ngahirakarangi Busby – Intermediate Girl (13–15 years)
  • Te Atatu Branch – Intermediate Boy
    (13–15 years)
  • Dame Miraka Szazy – Senior Girl
    (16 years and over)
  • Tū Hikitia – Senior Boy (16 years and over)

They were judged by a panel of 12 te reo Māori experts, which included two judges nominated by the Ministry of Education.

It was obvious that speakers had committed a lot of time and effort to prepare for their time on stage and the pride of representing their school, kura and whānau. They were deep in concentration, going over their lines, while those who had been on stage stood with heads held high and a certificate of participation in their hands.

With a clear sense of pride, respect and focus in the air, the day was set for Māori rangatahi, as leaders of tomorrow, to deliver their important words and inspire others.

Rangatahi making their mark

The Education Gazette spoke to some of the talented young orators.

Jacqueline Te Kani-Nankivell presents her speech.

Jacqueline Te Kani-Nankivell presents her speech.

Jaqueline Te Kani-Nankivell

Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Uri A Māui

Division: E Tipu e Rea | Junior Girl
(10–12 years)

What made you want to join the competition?

Well my nan was one of the old presidents of the Māori Women’s Welfare League. I wanted to carry on that legacy and make the family proud and make my hapu and iwi proud.

Who helped you with your speech?

My dad really helped me with my speech and he’s been the one that’s really been mentoring me and helping me and been by my side for most of these past weeks.

What advice would you give to someone who is thinking about joining the competition?

Learn your words, try not to forget your words and use up the whole stage because for those seven minutes that you are on the stage, it’s all yours.

Rewi Te Kani-Nankivell

Rewi Te Kani-Nankivell was a competitor in the E Tipu e Rea division.

Rewi was a competitor in the E Tipu e Rea division.

Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Uri A Māui

Division: E Tipu e Rea | Junior Boy
(10–12 years)

How did you feel when you were up on stage?

Nervous and tired but it was fun.

What made you want to join the competition?

My nan who was the president of the Māori Women’s Welfare League. Yeah, it just runs through the family, it’s our legacy.

What’s the best part about this competition?

Seeing all the people stand and perform and being able to find out what they do. But also… getting a feed after this [laughs].

Ariana Poihipi-Black

Whakatane High School

Division: Dame Miraka Szazy | Senior Girl
(16 years and over)

What was your speech about?

My speech was about mental health. It relates to the Māori Women’s Welfare League with the violence that goes on. It’s relevant to Māori wahine.

Why do you think this competition is important?

I think it’s important because I just want to get this message out there to everybody that there is a solution in whatever situation you may find yourself in, especially Māori. This competition is a way to get my message out there to women, to men and to children.

How have you seen the competition develop through the years?

Many rangatahi are getting out there to represent themselves and represent their iwi. So it’s good to see that the rate has gone higher. It’s good to see that it’s from a group of people that think ‘I want to do that!’

What advice would you give to the rangatahi that are about to enter the competition?

I would say, be confident, nobody knows what your speech is about or if you are going to muck up. However, just be confident and speak up and keep your head held high.

Uenuku Papuni Abbott

Uenuku Papuni Abbott

Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi

Division: Tū Hikitia | Senior Boy
(16 years and over)

How have you benefited from this competition?

I really like this competition. I started this competition back in 2015 as a junior speaker in the regionals where I ended up coming second. I didn’t qualify for nationals but that was all right because it made me think about what I could do better.

I liked being able to go to the wānanga and meeting different teachers and being able to ask questions and learn from them. It’s through this that I was able to get where I am today.

I like being able to give back to Te Ropu Wahine Māori Toko i te Ora, they have done so much for the Ngā Pū Korero ō Āpōpō and Kōrero Te Reo competitions.

What advice would you give to youth entering this competition for the first time?

Be yourself. At the end of the day, it’s about being confident, standing up for what you believe in and what you are passionate about.

How have your friends and whānau helped you through this journey?

By asking how I am and making sure my wairua is all good and looking after me. They have also come to support me at all of my speech competitions. Without them, I wouldn’t be here.

Moreku Kahukiwa

Te Kura Māori-a-Rohe o Waiohau

Division: Tū Hikitia | Senior Boy
(16 years and over)

Why do you think this competition is important?

This competition is important to rangatahi to help us stand up and not be shy to talk.

What have you learnt from this competition and how have you grown?

I’ve gained confidence through this competition. I have also been able to help other rangatahi to stand up and talk.

What advice would you give to the rangatahi that are about to enter the competition?

Don’t be shy. Just get up and do it!

Next year’s competition will be held in Christchurch.

For more information about Ngā Pū Kōrero o Āpōpō, visit mwwl.org.nz/national-conference-2019/nga-pu-korero-info.

To watch the recorded live-stream from this year’s event, visit facebook.com/mwwlorg.

Speech topics

Each speaker chose one of six topics for their speech.

Junior topics

1.  He waka eke noa

The canoe which we are all in, without exception

2.  Mauri tu, mauri ora

The principles and essence of Mauri

3.  He taonga te kotiro, he taonga hoki te kuia

Women, young and elderly, are precious

4.  Whakaorangatia ta matou wai Māori

Enhance the health and wellbeing of our freshwater resources

5.  Manukura

Leadership

6.  Tatau, tatau

All of us, together

Intermediate topics

1.  He aha tenei mea te whānau ora?

What is whānau ora?

2.  He tangata whai hua, whai mana, tauwhainga ano i te ao?

Tell us about someone who has achieved and excelled in the world who inspires you?

3.  Ko toku reo Māori, ko toku reo wairua

My Māori language is my spiritual language

4.  Nga tapuwae a o tatou tupuna

The footsteps of our ancestors

5.  Manukura

Leadership

6.  Tatau, tatau

All of us, together

Senior topics

1.  Ki te kahore he whakaoranga, ka noho tonu ngā herehere me ngā patunga ki o ratou ake hinaki

You are only limited by the things you allow yourself to be limited by

2.  He kai kai aku ringa

With your hands you can create your future.

3.  He aha āu wawata, āu manako mō te reo I a koe e pakeke haere ana?

What are your dreams and aspirations for the Māori language?

4.  I heke iho tō whenua I ō tīpuna – ko koe hei kaitiaki mōna hei ngā tau ki tua. Whakamāramahia mai tētahi pūrākau e pā ana ki tō whenua, ki ōu tīpuna rānei me ngā pātanga o taua pūrakau ki tō whanau, hapū, iwi hoki. Ka pēwhea rā koe (whanau, hapū, iwi rānei) puritia ai taua mātauranga hei oranga mō ngā reanga kei te heke mai?

You have been bestowed the responsibility of guardian of the land which has been handed down by your ancestors. Share a story about this land and/or your ancestors, and how it enhances your whānau, hapū and iwi wellbeing. Also share how you will use that information and knowledge to enhance and maintain wellbeing for future generations.

5.  Manukura

Leadership

6.  Tatau, tatau

All of us, together

 

Helping Māori reclaim their tino rangatiratanga

Te Ropu Wahine Māori Toko i te Ora | Māori Women’s Welfare League has hosted Ngā Pū Kōrero o Āpōpō since 1977, with a clear mission to help Māori reclaim their tino rangatiratanga as a people and take control of their destiny.

The purpose of the competition is to:

  • increase leadership and relationship across tamariki and rangatahi
  • support the growth of fluent te reo Māori speakers, to revive, preserve and maintain te reo Māori
  • increase the confidence of tamariki and rangatahi to speak te reo Māori in a public forum
  • support whānau to increase the use of te reo Māori
  • build and strengthen relationships within our communities.

BY Education Gazette editors
Education Gazette | Tukutuku Kōrero, reporter@edgazette.govt.nz

Posted: 9:27 am, 28 October 2019

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